Welcome to Immunity, Infection and Evolution!

To establish an internationally outstanding centre for cross-disciplinary research across the broad scope of infectious disease, capturing the full potential for synergy between molecular, genetic, mathematical and evolutionary biologists in addressing the major challenges in global health today.

Job opportunity for PDRA(s) at CIIE

CIIE is currently looking to attract dynamic and enthusiastic researchers, eager to operate at the interface between disciplines (e.g. infection biology, immunology, evolutionary biology, ecology, epidemiology and mathematical modelling) to create new research paradigms to tackle infectious diseases.

With the recent success in funding applications by our current CIIE PDRAs, we now have the opportunity to support 1 or 2 additional CIIE PDRAs for up to 12 months (i.e. until early 2017).

Mothers’ appetites can keep size of wild animal groups in check

The eating habits of mothers may be key to keeping wild animal populations steady, a study suggests.

The discovery shows that the food intake of mothers – which impacts on the appetite of their offspring – protects animals from periods of population boom and bust.

Study charts hotspots for bat virus

Edinburgh scientists have helped pinpoint world regions most at risk of bat viruses spilling over into humans.

West Africa, sub-Saharan Africa and South East Asia are most at risk from bat viruses leading to new emerging diseases in people, according to the new global map.

Professor Keith Matthews awarded Sanofi Pasteur mid career award

CIIE Director, Professor Keith Matthews has been awarded a €75,000 prize recognising his research into the parasite that causes sleeping sickness.

The prize is one of four given annually by French company Sanofi and the Institut Pasteur, which recognise major contributions in the service of health. His award is given in the mid-career category.

Latest technology could help curb repeat Ebola crisis, experts say

Recent developments in surveillance technology could enable a swifter, more effective response to potentially deadly outbreaks of disease, a study has found.

The Ebola crisis has highlighted a need to bolster global surveillance and enhance the capability to react appropriately to further outbreaks, experts say.

Announcing a new Wellcome Trust funded 4yr PhD programme in Edinburgh “Hosts, Pathogens & Global Health”

The School of Biological Sciences in partnership with the Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution and Edinburgh Infectious Diseases has been awarded a new 4 yr PhD programme by the Wellcome Trust.

The programme in "Hosts, Pathogens and Global Health" will start in September 2016 with the deadline for application on 7 December 2015 this year.

Superbug study reveals how E. coli strain acquired deadly powers

A strain of E. coli became a potentially fatal infection in the UK around 30 years ago, when it acquired a powerful toxin, a gene study has revealed.

The discovery helps to explain outbreaks of severe food poisoning that began in the 1980s.

CIIE Winter Symposium: Circadian Rhythms in Health & Disease

We are pleased to announce that the CIIE Winter Symposium Circadian Rhythms in Health & Disease will be held on Friday, 11th December 2015 in Lecture Theatre 1, Ashworth Laboratories, University of Edinburgh.

This will be an all-day event.

Three workshops on ‘A Guide to Successful & Responsible Publishing’ were held in Zimbabwe during July 2015

The series of workshops was led by three academics from the Universities of Edinburgh and Zimbabwe, and Africa University, and aimed to inform researchers about Successful and Responsible Publishing. 

The workshops, supported by PLoS journals and University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Immunity and Infection Research, were a huge success, drawing over 160 participants; 68 participants attended the workshop at Africa University, 38 at the event held in the Bronte Hotel, Harare, and 60 came to the University of Zimbabwe.

CIIE Visitor: Prof Ruth Ley

As part of our Visiting Scientists Scheme CIIE will be hosting a visit from Ruth Ley (Cornell).

On Tuesday 21st July 2015 at 12 p.m. in Lecture Theatre 3, Ashworth Laboratries, Ruth will give a seminar entitled: "The gene-microbe link".

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